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Labeling Charts In Research Papers Apa Format

This guide is based on the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association, 6th ed. It provides selected citation examples for common types of sources. For more detailed information please consult a print copy of the style manual available at the SFU Library and at the SFU Bookstore.

For the best printing results for this guide, use the printer-friendly PDF format.

Tables - Single source (Chapter 5, pp. 125-149)

The following example is for a table you have reproduced in your paper exactly as it appears in another source: Same format or state, no reconfiguration or new analysis.

Above the table

Include the word Table with its number next to it (Rule 5.05, p. 127).

Give a title which describes the contents of the table (Rule 5.12, p. 133).

Below the table

Include the word Note. before your citation.

Example:

Comments:

  • Tables are characterized by a row-column structure.
  • All tables must be referred to in text.
  • The information that should appear in the Note below the table must include the following:
  • This work must have a full bibliographic entry in your Reference List even though the information in the Note field uses a lot of the same information.

Tables - compiled from variety of sources (Chapter 5, pp. 125-149)

If you have compiled data from a variety of different sources and put it together to form your own table, you still need to cite where you got the information from.

Above the table:

Include the word Table with its number next to it (Rule 5.05, p. 127).

Give a title which describes the contents of the table (Rule 5.12, p. 133).

Below the table:

All sources that have been used to create the table's data need to be cited in a Note. below the table. You do not need to give the full bibliographic citation - Author (date) is sufficient.

Example:

Comments:

  • Tables are characterized by a row-column structure.
  • All tables must be referred to in text.
  • Use the term "Adapted" instead of "Reprinted" if you have altered the table.
  • When using multi-source data you want to describe what data is coming from where. e.g.:
  • ​If you have multiple kinds of data (population figures, consumer information, etc...) in one table you would describe each set of data. e.g.:
  • All the sources must have a full bibliographic entry in your Reference List even though the information in the Note field uses a lot of the same information.

Figures - Single source (Chapter 5, pp. 150-167)

Figures include: maps, graphs, charts, drawings, and photographs, or any other illustration or non-textual depiction in printed or electronic resources. (Chapter 5.0, p. 125)

You may also refer to SFU's customised APA citation guides for Citing Images.

The following example is for citing a figure that you have reprinted directly from another source: same format or state, no reconfiguration or new analysis.

Below the figure:

Place the Figure #, caption which describes the contents, then end with the citation information (if reproduced from another source) (Rules 5.23, pp. 159-160).

Example: 

Comments: 

  • The figure should not include a title.
  • The information that should appear after the Figure #. below the table must include the following:
  • The figure # is as it would appear, numbered consecutively, in your paper - not the figure # assigned to it in its original resource.
  • All figures must be mentioned in text.
  • Each figure must have a full bibliographic entry in your Reference List.
  • If publishing in a journal or as thesis, then before you reproduce any image in your paper it may be necessary to get copyright permission to do so from the original copyright holder and place the wording  at the end of your citation.

Figures - Compiled from variety of sources(Chapter 5, pp. 150-167)

Figures include: maps, graphs, charts, drawings, and photographs, or any other illustration or nontextual depiction in printed or electronic resources (Chapter 5.0, p. 125).

The following example is for citing a figure that you have created by compiling information from a variety of sources. For example, if you combined data from Passport GMID, Statistics Canada, and a book to create a new chart.

Below the figure:

All sources that have been used to create the figure need to be cited in the figure caption - after its number and name. You do not need to give the full bibliographic citation - Author (date) is sufficient.

Example:

Comments: 

  • The figure should not include a title.
  • The figure # is as it would appear, numbered consecutively, in your paper - not the figure # assigned to it in its original resource.
  • Use the term "Adapted" instead of "Reprinted" if you have altered the figure.
  • When using multi-source data you want to describe what data is coming from where. e.g.:
  • All figures must be mentioned in text.
  • All the sources must have a full bibliographic entry in your Reference List.
  • If publishing in a journal or as thesis, then before you reproduce any image in your paper it may be necessary to get copyright permission to do so from the original copyright holder and place the wording  at the end of your citation.

Reproducing Images, Charts, Tables & Graphs

Reproducing happens when you copy or recreate an image, table, graph or chart that is not your original creation. If you reproduce one of these works in your assignment, you must create a note underneath the image, chart, table or graph to show where you found it. You do not include this information in a Reference list.

Citing Information From an Image, Chart, Table or Graph

If you refer to information from an image, chart, table or graph, but do not reproduce it in your paper, create a citation both in-text and on your Reference list.

If the information is part of another format, for example a book, magazine article, encyclopedia, etc., cite the work it came from. For example if information came from a table in an article in National Geographic magazine, you would cite the entire article.

If you are only making a passing reference to a well known image, you would not have to cite it, e.g. describing someone as having a Mona Lisa smile.

Figure Numbers

Each image you reproduce should be assigned a figure number, starting with number 1 for the first image used in the assignment.

Title

Images may not have a set title. If this is the case give a description of the image where you would normally put the title.

Copyright Information

Include copyright information in the citation if it is given, including the year and the copyright holder. Copyright information on a website may often be found at the bottom of the home page.

Still Need Help?

For more information on citing figures in MAPA, see Purdue Owl 1 and Purdue Owl 2.

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